Nissan 400Z Forum - Release Date, Specs, Pricing Discussion banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
148 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Nissan sent out a press release this morning mentioning how many models Nissan offers in orange. If Nissan feels there is a market for orange on so many pedestrian models, it's probably likely the Z will also be offered in orange.


"Nissan has draped its most iconic and best-selling vehicles in tones of orange for the past 50 years, from the 1970 Datsun 240Z to the all-new 2021 Rogue. Currently nine of Nissan’s most popular vehicles are available in brilliant shades of orange, which is more than any other automaker in the United States.

While an orange-colored exterior might not be the highest volume paint option, people who choose it are cut from their own cloth, Fonseca says.

“Orange is for a very specific customer,” she said. “They’re bold, confident and secure… and those are the same words we use when we’re developing the different hues of orange at the design center.”

The latest implementations of orange in the lineup is credited largely to Fonseca and her team. She created the color named Sunset Drift, found on the current Nissan Altima, Maxima, Murano and LEAF vehicles.

Orange evokes a feeling that no other color does, and I love to incorporate it into our designs,” said Fonseca. “Your car is an extension of who you are, and color is a big part of that. It’s the same as picking the colors for your nails, makeup or home – you do so to make a statement and show your personality.”

"We knew orange was iconic to the brand especially with our sports cars. We built on that popularity and, with advances available to us now in the paint process, have created show-stopping orange hues that are more than interior accents. These are colors that set Nissan apart and are attracting new customers to our brand.”

Fonseca and team look back to icons like the original Z for inspiration, and also to important vehicles that recently debuted in orange, as well.

Fonseca says most orange-hued models are created using a special multidimensional process that results in a vibrancy that leaves a big impression on customers.

“To make orange look good on a car, the color has to be really saturated,” Fonseca explains. “We use a different paint pigment for these colors called ChromaFlair®.”

ChromaFlair® makes the paint appear as different colors depending on the light source and view angle."



755

756


Designing a color for a new car is a long process and involves more than digital renderings. Part of the process involves spraying full vehicles, so designers can get a better understanding of scale and shape. The full-size mock-ups are painted down the center so they can review two different colors simultaneously.

“We need to evaluate them in real life,” Fonseca says. “Orange is very challenging to get just right. It can’t be too yellow or too red. It has to have the perfect balance.”

The color orange, with roots reaching back to the early days of Nissan sports cars, is not likely to reach its sunset anytime soon. With Nissan launching 10 new products over the span of 20 months, Fonseca and her team of color designers will tell you that, “new hues and a bright future” are what they are dreaming up for Nissan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
This is a good decision. Assuming it is the same hue as the GTR, that is, and not a darker cinnamon-orange color. I really hope that the palate for the Zed is a bold one (plus Pearl White, naturally).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
165 Posts
These possible options also feels like a death of a thousand needles. Just give us all the information upfront. Something to talk about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
I do wish that Nissan were being more transparent about the Z, particularly since the proverbial cat is basically out of the bag already. It's possible that they intend to drip-feed information about the vehicle over the next, say, 6 months or so in order to keep enthusiast interest percolating. But, if so, I admit that they aren't currently doing a terrific job with that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Nissan sent out a press release this morning mentioning how many models Nissan offers in orange. If Nissan feels there is a market for orange on so many pedestrian models, it's probably likely the Z will also be offered in orange.


"Nissan has draped its most iconic and best-selling vehicles in tones of orange for the past 50 years, from the 1970 Datsun 240Z to the all-new 2021 Rogue. Currently nine of Nissan’s most popular vehicles are available in brilliant shades of orange, which is more than any other automaker in the United States.

While an orange-colored exterior might not be the highest volume paint option, people who choose it are cut from their own cloth, Fonseca says.

“Orange is for a very specific customer,” she said. “They’re bold, confident and secure… and those are the same words we use when we’re developing the different hues of orange at the design center.”

The latest implementations of orange in the lineup is credited largely to Fonseca and her team. She created the color named Sunset Drift, found on the current Nissan Altima, Maxima, Murano and LEAF vehicles.

Orange evokes a feeling that no other color does, and I love to incorporate it into our designs,” said Fonseca. “Your car is an extension of who you are, and color is a big part of that. It’s the same as picking the colors for your nails, makeup or home – you do so to make a statement and show your personality.”

"We knew orange was iconic to the brand especially with our sports cars. We built on that popularity and, with advances available to us now in the paint process, have created show-stopping orange hues that are more than interior accents. These are colors that set Nissan apart and are attracting new customers to our brand.”

Fonseca and team look back to icons like the original Z for inspiration, and also to important vehicles that recently debuted in orange, as well.

Fonseca says most orange-hued models are created using a special multidimensional process that results in a vibrancy that leaves a big impression on customers.

“To make orange look good on a car, the color has to be really saturated,” Fonseca explains. “We use a different paint pigment for these colors called ChromaFlair®.”

ChromaFlair® makes the paint appear as different colors depending on the light source and view angle."



View attachment 755
View attachment 756

Designing a color for a new car is a long process and involves more than digital renderings. Part of the process involves spraying full vehicles, so designers can get a better understanding of scale and shape. The full-size mock-ups are painted down the center so they can review two different colors simultaneously.

“We need to evaluate them in real life,” Fonseca says. “Orange is very challenging to get just right. It can’t be too yellow or too red. It has to have the perfect balance.”

The color orange, with roots reaching back to the early days of Nissan sports cars, is not likely to reach its sunset anytime soon. With Nissan launching 10 new products over the span of 20 months, Fonseca and her team of color designers will tell you that, “new hues and a bright future” are what they are dreaming up for Nissan.
918 Orange please!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
165 Posts
I do wish that Nissan were being more transparent about the Z, particularly since the proverbial cat is basically out of the bag already. It's possible that they intend to drip-feed information about the vehicle over the next, say, 6 months or so in order to keep enthusiast interest percolating. But, if so, I admit that they aren't currently doing a terrific job with that.
Honestly, no matter what I’m getting the car. As you put it drip feeding, that’s not going to keep me interested. Im fully interested. Just not patient. Lol. I’m truly hard core fan. I’m in no matter. Just give me the info. It’s not going to be a surprise. Just want a rough date. Well, maybe the big brake kit on the final production would be a surprise to me. I really want that standard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
The big brake kit would be a surprise if it wound up as standard equipment, for certain. Something like that on a Sport Package or, almost certainly, a NISMO model seems more likely.

Frankly, my demands are these: keep the styling basically the same as the Proto (tweak the front fascia if you must), have the 400hp 3.0TT as the standard engine, offer some interesting paint colors and wheel options, and for god's sake keep the pricing below that of the bloody Supra (the Z can't realistically START in the mid-high 40's - this isn't new tech or a new platform so that would be a colossal miscalculation).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
164 Posts
I believe there will be a base model with NA or turbo 4 and doubt the BBK (BBS?) will be standard on all models to keep price points lower. The TT will be on higher models along with susp upgrades, ala Sport and Nismo. Please keep Nismo at or below $55K. Based on how good that BBK is, I may or may not order it and upgrade to better options later. For sure will order the TT and if optional aero pkgs are avail. Nismo possible if the styling is not overdone. I'm sold either case, can't wait, give us some dates already.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
While I certainly don't think it's out of the question for there to be various engine outputs offered, I am not so sure there will be different engines. I have seen people speculate about that, but based upon what actual evidence, I wonder? I realize that Nissan is being super cagey about the entire thing, annoyingly, but the notion that there will be a lower-power offering than, say, the current Z, seems strange and unnecessary.

For instance, if the 3.0TT in 300hp tune were the "base" model powertrain, you'd have to square why it was suddenly slower than a base 370 (which isn't guaranteed, but is plausible based upon how it performs with the somewhat heavier Q60). So, what, maybe the base model would have 350hp or something like that? But why develop an entirely different tune just to artificially stratify the lineup? My point is that they haven't done that in recent generations (with only the NISMO receiving a power bump in Z34, obviously) so I don't know why there is this belief that it will suddenly happen now.

Have I missed some key leak from Nissan, perhaps?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
165 Posts
I don’t want to see different motors. I wanna see one motor and two models that may offer other options. But I’m sure they will just to have an affordable model for all.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
164 Posts
That CEO drive video only mentioned the 400 hp TT so it's possible to only offer that across all models, but doubt it. At that hp level it won't be at an affordable price point for some. I have to have the 400 no matter what models offered, keeping an eye on the Nismo. Just need to cap it at $60K, or will just pony up for the C8.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SPOHN

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
My hope is that they keep the model structure similar to that of the Z34 - a single engine/output for the majority of the lineup differentiated by the various add-ons and standard equipment offered with various packages. For (rough) instance:
  • Nissan Z Base (3.0tt)
  • Nissan Z Sport (3.0tt, aero, larger wheels, big brake kit, suspension upgrade)
  • Nissan Z Touring (3.0tt, aero, technology package, upgraded interior)
  • Nissan Z Grand Touring (3.0tt, combine Sport and Touring amenities)
  • Nissan Z NISMO (3.0tt NISMO Spec, new aero kit, brakes, wheels, etc)

And then have various sub-packages like a carbon fiber pack, wheel/brake package, aero kit as stand alone factory options.

This way, the engine generally remains a mono-spec item in the lineup until you get to the NISMO and you basically (if you're Nissan) use that as the fundamental basis upon which you are justifying what will at least be 25% price increase. I don't know, that's how I'd approach it, I think.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top