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I didnt really get that from the article. as it was written around two vague quotes about we might do electrification and it needs to be the fastest. the mention of a new platform is intriguing but only kinda sorta news here. An electrified GTR cant run on the 14 year old premium midship anyway so that goes without saying if they go anything than the current car with a 48v mild hybrid assist which was rumored last year. my 2009 GTR cost me 72K. the entry level 2021 costs 113K and its 14 year old chassis. there are a few issues here. the first is a true hybrid GTR could not possibly start for under 150K and thus it would be a repeat of everything the NSX suffered. the other problem is it just cant be the fastest again without it becoming unobtainable to most. the current GTR plateaued in performance around 2014. at that time it was head to head with Z06's 458s and even the TurboS . in the 7 years since from a strictly performance standpoint it was stagnant. currently
the 2021 GTR NISMO that costs 213K isnt faster than a 80K C8 with the Z51 package.

the GTR is in a weird spot right now. the pandemic has made used prices go through the roof but as for a new car... if you keep the evolution small it wont be enough the catch up to the pace its lost and if you make a revolutionary car to compete with mclaren and porsche again your core owner base wont be able to afford them and will focus on R35 builds.


Ive seen this fork in the road coming for years now and its the main reason ive decided to shift my focus more toward the Z.
 

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I didnt really get that from the article. as it was written around two vague quotes about we might do electrification and it needs to be the fastest. the mention of a new platform is intriguing but only kinda sorta news here. An electrified GTR cant run on the 14 year old premium midship anyway so that goes without saying if they go anything than the current car with a 48v mild hybrid assist which was rumored last year. my 2009 GTR cost me 72K. the entry level 2021 costs 113K and its 14 year old chassis. there are a few issues here. the first is a true hybrid GTR could not possibly start for under 150K and thus it would be a repeat of everything the NSX suffered. the other problem is it just cant be the fastest again without it becoming unobtainable to most. the current GTR plateaued in performance around 2014. at that time it was head to head with Z06's 458s and even the TurboS . in the 7 years since from a strictly performance standpoint it was stagnant. currently
the 2021 GTR NISMO that costs 213K isnt faster than a 80K C8 with the Z51 package.

the GTR is in a weird spot right now. the pandemic has made used prices go through the roof but as for a new car... if you keep the evolution small it wont be enough the catch up to the pace its lost and if you make a revolutionary car to compete with mclaren and porsche again your core owner base wont be able to afford them and will focus on R35 builds.


Ive seen this fork in the road coming for years now and its the main reason ive decided to shift my focus more toward the Z.
Yep that’s true, I don’t know how they’ll do it with reachable price points for most buyers. The C8 Z51 is a killer setup not to mention upcoming Z06/Z07 package, still under $150k it’s basically a detuned C8R.

The new Z on the other hand is a basic RWD setup with good power and chassis as starting points for tuners 👍
 

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I didnt really get that from the article. as it was written around two vague quotes about we might do electrification and it needs to be the fastest. the mention of a new platform is intriguing but only kinda sorta news here. An electrified GTR cant run on the 14 year old premium midship anyway so that goes without saying if they go anything than the current car with a 48v mild hybrid assist which was rumored last year. my 2009 GTR cost me 72K. the entry level 2021 costs 113K and its 14 year old chassis. there are a few issues here. the first is a true hybrid GTR could not possibly start for under 150K and thus it would be a repeat of everything the NSX suffered. the other problem is it just cant be the fastest again without it becoming unobtainable to most. the current GTR plateaued in performance around 2014. at that time it was head to head with Z06's 458s and even the TurboS . in the 7 years since from a strictly performance standpoint it was stagnant. currently
the 2021 GTR NISMO that costs 213K isnt faster than a 80K C8 with the Z51 package.

the GTR is in a weird spot right now. the pandemic has made used prices go through the roof but as for a new car... if you keep the evolution small it wont be enough the catch up to the pace its lost and if you make a revolutionary car to compete with mclaren and porsche again your core owner base wont be able to afford them and will focus on R35 builds.


Ive seen this fork in the road coming for years now and its the main reason ive decided to shift my focus more toward the Z.
Jalopnik touched on that in an article they released today.


On one hand this is refreshing. It says to me that Nissan isn’t interested in defining the GT-R’s personality around electric power. Hell, even Dodge is banging that drum. That could potentially result in one of the last great ICE performance offerings, though not purely ICE depending on how Nissan ultimately goes about it. Imagine the GT-R we’ve all known and loved with a little boost. At a time when everyone else is desperate to distance themselves from the past, Nissan giving the twin-turbo V6 a last hurrah doesn’t sound too bad at all.

On the other hand, the fact Nissan still can’t commit to a clear direction for the R35's replacement — at least to the media — despite the company’s brain trust ruminating over it for a whole decade isn’t an encouraging sign. Back in 2019, GT-R program lead Hiroshi Tamura indicated that while he had strong feelings about what a theoretical successor should be, it hadn’t been greenlit yet. It’s now 2021, and we’re still hearing execs at the company discuss “looking into” electrification in the vaguest of terms and championing traditional powertrains. What happened?

When the R35 came out, you couldn’t read 200 words on the thing without happening across the same trite metaphor likening the steering to a PlayStation controller or whatever. The car was respected for its paradoxical mix of capability and daily drivability, but also derided for being too cold and inorganic, a vision of a sanitized future. My, how the turns have tabled. All I hope is that the next time there’s a crumb of news about this car, it’s based more in the physical rather than the theoretical.
 
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